Are Your Interview Questions Getting a Little Outdated?

Posted March 29, 2017 by Megan DiMartino

There are an endless amount of questions that an interviewer can ask a job applicant. But let’s ask you a couple questions first – Are these questions you’re asking pertinent to the open position at hand? Are they beneficial in collecting true information regarding your potential employee? If you’re asking the following questions, then the answer is most likely no:

  1. What’s your greatest weakness? – Everyone has weaknesses. A weakness is something you could be better at doing than you currently are and of course we can all strive to be better! This question can be intrusive and personal and doesn’t provide an answer that helps with the hiring decision.
  2. Where do you see yourself in five years? – This question can sometimes be a trap as interviewers want to determine if you’re a responsible adult with firm plans rather than a “child” who doesn’t have their mind made up yet. Life isn’t set in stone, so the next five years shouldn’t have to be either.
  3. What’s your greatest failure so far? – Goes right along with “your greatest weakness.”
  4. With all the talented candidates, why should we hire you? – As the interviewer, you’re the one that knows the ins and outs of the position so you’re the one who should know what to look for in a candidate. Practical questions should be asked about the work that is performed in the role in order to assess the candidate’s suitability for the job.
  5. What would your last boss say about you? – The integrity of their last boss isn’t at stake here, it’s about the applicant. Not all bosses are created equal and not every employee goes to work to please their boss, but to do their job and do it well.

These five questions have been a part of many interviews and also, whether you mean to or not, emphasize the unhealthy viewpoint that employers are mighty and job applicants are trivial.

So get rid of these out-of-date questions and replace them with these smart, thought provoking and realistic questions to use in your next interview:

  1. What can I tell you about this job or the company? – The candidate’s responses/questions will tell you a lot about their attitude level, their understanding of the role and business world in general, their priorities and their preparedness for the interview.
  2. How does this role fit into your career plans? – This will help determine if the candidate is just simply looking for a job (which may fit some roles) or if they’re serious about the position and their future with the company.
  3. As you think about yourself performing this job, what do you imagine will be the biggest challenges as you get started? – This question will make it clear if the applicant thought through the job requirements and their abilities and experiences to fill the role adequately.
  4. From what you understand about the job, which of your experiences at work or somewhere else do you feel will help you in this job? – This is a great way to obtain some evidence that the applicant can handle the position.
  5. If you take this position, how do you expect to tackle the new job and the projects we’re discussing? In a general way, what will be your plan of attack? – By asking this question you’ll get some insight as to how the candidate’s mind works and processes their potential new role.

Source: Forbes | Five Interview Questions To Stop Asking – And Five to Ask Instead

For more information contact info@crawfordadvisors.com. The information contained in this post, and any attachments, is not intended and should not be misconstrued as legal advice. You should contact your employment, benefits or ERISA attorney for legal direction.

New Bill May Allow Parents to Use FMLA for Loss of a Child

Posted March 27, 2017 by Megan DiMartino

A new bill was recently introduced to the U.S. House of Representatives that would amend the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) to permit parents the use of leave to mourn the death of a child.

The new bill, known as the Sarah Grace-Farley-Kluger Act, would add “because of the death of a son or daughter” to the list of FMLA entitlements and would allow parents to take up to 12 weeks of leave.

The bill has garnered bipartisan support. Republican Congressman Paul Gosar (AZ) is one of the bill’s co-sponsors and described the legislation as “commonsense” as a way to allow parents to cope with such a devastating loss and still remain productive at work.

“As a father of three amazing children myself, I know I can speak for everyone here today that our goal is to protect the rights of grieving parents who face the unthinkable pain of losing a child,” said Gosar. “Expanding the FMLA to cover parents coping with the devastation of losing a child is beyond reasonable and should have been included when the legislation was originally passed.”

“This commonsense, bipartisan bill is about what we are supposed to be doing in Congress – identifying problems and solving them together in a way that makes sense to help the people that we represent,” said Congresswoman Martha McSally (AZ). “Giving grieving parents the option for time off from work equal to that for parents who have given birth and adopted, simply makes sense to all of us who are in support of this bill.”

It is said that this legislation is less expensive and less controversial than requiring employers to provide paid family medical leave. President Trump is in support of some kind of paid family leave, but as of now this new bill could help move along the pending request for paid leave.

Should the Sarah Grace-Farley-Kluger Act not pass, it may be in the best interest of employers to consider adding such a policy to help create a more compassionate workplace.

Sources: The Employer Handbook by Eric B. Meyer | The FMLA may be amended to include leave for a parent to grieve the loss of a child

For more information contact info@crawfordadvisors.com. The information contained in this post, and any attachments, is not intended and should not be misconstrued as legal advice. You should contact your employment, benefits or ERISA attorney for legal direction.

Wellness Programs May Not Always Be Healthy for the Employer

Posted March 24, 2017 by Megan DiMartino

Fitness bands have become more and more popular over the years and you can bet that most of your employees are wearing some kind of device to track their biometrics. These devices can do everything from counting steps, to administering medical tests, to analyzing one’s quality of sleep. So this means employers could have firsthand access to employees’ personal information, but also to a legal trap.

One use for this biometric data, and probably the most prevalent, is to offer employees insurance premium discounts, bonuses, or other incentives to raise health consciousness or to get employees to reach a certain activity level. Offering such programs gives employers such information as activity levels, nutritional habits, and certain physical characteristics, which if not handled properly by the employer could lead to disability or discrimination claims.

As of right now, Illinois and Texas are the only two states to have enacted statutes that define specifically what constitutes biometric data; and only a few more states – Alaska, California, New York and Washington – have proposed legislation on the issue.

As an employer, what do you do?
Based off of the key provisions of the Illinois and Texas state laws, here are some guidelines for employers that are in possession of its employees’ biometric data:

  1. Always provide employees with written notice of biometric data collection and storage, and explain the reason for the collection and the length of time the data will be stored;
  2. Require employees to give written consent to the data collection;
  3. Protect the collected biometric information from disclosure unless the employee gives prior written consent to disclosure or the disclosure is required or permitted under state or federal statute, or in response to a warrant from law enforcement or a valid subpoena, or to complete a financial transaction requested by the employee;
  4. Protect stored biometric data in a manner that is at least as protective as the means used to protect other confidential information;
  5. As with health information in general, separate biometric data from other employee records, and ensure that company access to such data is limited to those with a legitimate need-to-know;
  6. Never sell, lease, trade, or otherwise profit from the collected data;
  7. Maintain and make publically available a written retention policy that requires permanent destruction of the data by the earlier of the date when “the initial purpose for collecting or obtaining” the data has been “satisfied” or three years after the employee’s last contact with the organization; and
  8. Keep abreast of cases that address the appropriate use of biometric data and its collection and handling. For example, this relatively recent case addressed whether requiring biometric screenings as part of a wellness plan violated the Americans with Disabilities Act.

Sources: Labor & Employment Law Perspectives | Could Wellness Programs Be Making Your Company “Sick?” The Potential Perils of Collecting Biometric Data About Employees

For more information contact info@crawfordadvisors.com. The information contained in this post, and any attachments, is not intended and should not be misconstrued as legal advice. You should contact your employment, benefits or ERISA attorney for legal direction.

Best Practices to Survive a DOL FMLA Investigation

Posted March 20, 2017 by Megan DiMartino

The Department of Labor (DOL) is cracking down harder on their on-site investigations of employers’ facilities and are placing an emphasis on recordkeeping compliance, “systemic” violations, and supervisors’ accountability in administering FMLA. So this means employers need to be prepared if the DOL decides to pay a visit to check FMLA, request documents, and interview supervisors and employees. Take notes and prepare yourself for such a situation.

FMLA Investigation Survival Tips
FMLA requires employers to maintain the following records for a 3-year period:

  • Basic payroll information and identifying employee data, including compensation paid to the employee and the manner in which it was determined, as well as all additions and reductions in pay. (Even employers with no FMLA-covered employees must keep these records.)
  • A record of dates when FMLA leave is taken by FMLA-eligible employees (time records, requests for leave, etc., if so designated). Leave must be designated in records as FMLA leave. However, leave so designated may not include leave required under state law or an employer plan that is not also covered by the FMLA.
  • The hours of FMLA leave taken by eligible employees if in increments of less than 1-full day.
  • Copies of all notices given by the employer to employees, as well as any received by the employer requesting FMLA leave. Copies may be maintained in employee personnel files.
  • Policies and benefits. Information stored in any form (paper or electronic) that explains employer policies and employee benefits and the payment for benefits.
  • Records of any dispute between the employer and an eligible employee regarding the designation of leave as FMLA leave, including any written statement from the employer or employee of the reasons for the designation and for the disagreement.
  • Records clearly showing that exempt employees worked fewer than 1,250 hours in a 12-month period, if leave is denied.
  • FMLA-related medical records and documents pertaining to medical certifications, recertifications, or medical histories of employees or employees’ family members created for the purposes of the FMLA.

Unless there are any complaints or cause to believe violations, the DOL may inspect records once every 12 months.

What Does an On-Site Investigation Look Like?
Usually FMLA investigations will warn of their presence beforehand, but it’s not necessary that they do so. Employers need to have everything in order from documents to the person who will be able to handle the investigation at a moment’s notice.

The on-site investigation generally proceeds in the following steps:

  • An investigative conference,
  • A records review,
  • Employee interviews,
  • A final conference call, and
  • Communication of the results of the investigation.

Investigative Conference
The investigator can request a conference explaining how the investigation will proceed and the employer’s contact person can request that the investigator explain the laws that might be implicated and what locations and/or categories of employees will be involved.

The contact person should not ask the investigator if the investigation came about from an employee complaint or which employee complained. Best practice is to keep thorough notes of what the investigator asked and the answers that were provided.

Records Review
The investigator will want to review whether the employer is covered under FMLA so they will need to review FMLA records, payroll records, and other relevant documents. And if the investigation was brought on by an employee complaint then more records will be needed to determine if that employee meets the FMLA eligibility requirements.

The employer’s contact person should have all the documents readily available for the investigator and should have counsel available as well to consult with whether or not photocopies or records should be removed from the premises. They should also be diligent in recording which documents the investigator reviewed.

Employee Interviews
The investigator will most likely want to speak to employees regarding the employer’s FMLA practices, so let employees know that they may – but are not required to – speak freely with the investigator without a fear of retaliation. The employee should feel comfortable going into the interview so first ask if they’re willing to be interviewed, let them know that the employer is cooperating with the investigation, and don’t try to control what they say. Should they want to speak openly about it afterward then keep notes of what they said, but don’t question them about the interview.

Final Conference 
This is when the investigator will disclose to the employer whether they have uncovered any violations and, if so, advise the employer on how to correct them.

The Results
If counsel is not involved already, this would be the best time to do so. Counsel will help the employer decide whether to:

  • Present additional facts or evidence to the DOL;
  • Concur with the investigator’s findings and comply with his or her instructions;
  • Enter negotiations to reduce the amount owed (this process, called “conciliation,” may or may not work, depending on the flagrancy of the violation and whether your liability is clear or more of a close call);
  • or Contest the finding(s).

Should counsel find violations of the FMLA, then the employer should promptly change its policy and/or procedures to prevent anymore violations.

Sources: HR Daily Advisor | Mastering Tough FMLA Issues: Effectively Managing FMLA Investigations by the DOL

Links:
FMLA Forms, Guidance and Fact Sheet

For more information contact info@crawfordadvisors.com. The information contained in this post, and any attachments, is not intended and should not be misconstrued as legal advice. You should contact your employment, benefits or ERISA attorney for legal direction.

HRCI & SHRM Pre-approved Crawford Advisors Webinar | Trump Healthcare Reform – Impact on ACA

Posted March 14, 2017 by Megan DiMartino

Join Crawford Advisors’ General Counsel and Vice President of Compliance, Patrick Haynes, for this HRCI* and SHRM** pre-approved webinar. Attorney Haynes will explore President Trump’s Healthcare Reforms and the potential impact on ACA regulations and compliance, in this complimentary, one-hour webinar.

 

Topics include:

  • Repeal/Replace Activities
    • Executive Order(s)
    • Reconciliation Activity to Date
  • Health Care Reform Proposals
    • Trump Campaign Proposals
    • Empowering Patients First (Price)
    • Patients’ Choice Act (Ryan, et al)
    • Other Proposals
  • Similarities/Broad Brush Conclusions
  • The “Dirty Dozen of ACA” & How They May Fare

Webinar Details:

  • Thursday, March 23, 2017
  • 1:00 – 2:00pm EDT
  • No Cost to Attend
  • This webinar is open to all HR and Finance Professionals – but not to brokers, agents, TPAs and PEOs.

*The use of this seal confirms that this activity has met HR Certification Institute’s (HRCI) criteria for recertification credit pre-approval. This activity has been approved for 1 HR (General) recertification credit hours toward aPHR, PHR, PHRca, SPHR, GPHR, PHRi, and SPHRi recertification through HRCI.

**Crawford Advisors is recognized by SHRM to offer Professional Development Credits (PDCs) for SHRM-CP or SHRM-SCP. This program is valid for 1 PDC for the SHRM-CP or SHRM-SCP. For more information about certification or recertification, please visit shrmcertification.org.

For more information contact info@crawfordadvisors.com. The information contained in this post, and any attachments, is not intended and should not be misconstrued as legal advice. You should contact your employment, benefits or ERISA attorney for legal direction.

ACA Repeal & Replace – New House Bill Details

Posted March 7, 2017 by PHaynes

House Republicans just released the latest version of the ACA repeal and replace legislation.  The good news for many of our clients is that the Congress has listened to you and us as your brokers, consultants, agents and administrators.  Many of us didn’t see the wisdom in upsetting the employer-sponsored-healthcare market (150+ million Americans enjoy coverage from their employer) in order to expand the coverage pool for another 40 million Americans.  So, the tax exclusion for employer-provided plans remains in place.

Here are Eight Key Provisions of the newly released plans

Cadillac Tax delayed until 2025.  The challenge to repeal the Cadillac Tax will continue.  While this plan delays the Cadillac Tax from 2020 to 2025. Most predictions indicate that a significant number of group health plans would trigger the 40% excise tax by 2025 if there aren’t any adjustments made to the threshold.  [You may recall that the current Cadillac Tax threshold is $10,200 for an individual plan and $27,500 for a family plan].   Last year, more than 2/3 of the House of Representatives supported an end to the Cadillac Tax and 90 Senators voted to repeal the tax too.

Individual mandate and Employer mandate taxes (penalties) will be eliminated.

HSAs (Health Savings Accounts) will be expanded.  The current proposal would allow for HSAs (coupled with HDHP plans) to permit $6,550 in deposits for an individual and $13,100 in deposits for a family.  In short, eligible participants would be allowed to put a full year’s Out-of-Pocket-Maximum into their HSA each year.  ($6,550 and $13,100 are the OOPMaxes for 2017 HDHP-HSA plans).

This bill includes an advance-able, refundable tax credit to assist those individuals with buying health insurance.  Starting at $2,000 per person, a family could qualify for as much as $14,000 per year.  These credits begin to phase-out for individuals earning $75,000/year or at $150,000 for couples filing joint tax returns.  And, the credits disappear completely for folks earning $215,000/year (individual) and $290,000/year (married, filing a joint return).

ACA’s most popular provisions will be kept.  Folks with preexisting conditions and children up to age 26 will continue to enjoy coverage.  But, while someone with a preexisting condition can buy coverage, they must maintain continuous coverage in order to keep their coverage (thus discouraging folks from only buying coverage when they are sickest).  By doing so, they’ll avoid the 30% penalty for being late/sick entrants.

Stabilize State Insurance Markets – to support and stabilize state markets, this plan gives states a $100 billion fund, to be spent over a decade, to help lower-income people to afford insurance.  This fund could be used to lower out-of-pocket costs, or to promote access to preventive care, etc.

Medicaid wind-down.  While some may highlight this as “the expansion in reverse”, this is truly a rollback of the Medicaid expansions under PPACA.  This plan gives a per-capita allocation where states are given a set amount for the number of people in each category, including the disabled, elderly, pregnant mothers and childless adults.

Health Care FSA – before the Affordable Care Act was in place, Employers/Plan Sponsors chose what their annual limit was for the HCFSA that they offered.  The ACA capped that at $2,500 and then, indexing it for inflation, allowed it to increase to $2,550 and then $2,600 per employee per year.  This plan eliminates that cap and restores Employer choice.  Remember, because HCFSAs operate like a self-funded health plan, Employers are “on the hook” for the full annual election on day 1 of the plan year and they assume the risk that the employees will remain for the entire year and pay that election back via pre-tax payroll deductions.  So, as 2017 ends and you consider what limit you’d like to have/use in 2018 (beginning 1/1/2018) tread carefully before you allow a $5,000 or $10,000 annual limit. (Use-it-or-lose it would still seem to apply as would the ability to rollover up to $500 from one year to the next).

The next steps for this legislation include being marked up in both the House Ways & Means and Energy & Commerce Committees this week.  Which means, this could be voted on the House floor very soon.

Links

Common Manager Mistakes When Conducting Interviews

Posted February 28, 2017 by Megan DiMartino

Mistake #1: Talking too much
An interview is time to learn about the potential employee so aim for an 85-15 split: 85% of the time you’re listening and 15% of the time you’re talking. Allow the interviewee ample amount of time to respond to your questions. These silences give you and the applicant time to reset after the previous question and gives you a chance to see how they handle pressure situations.

Mistake #2: Failing to prepare
Don’t let the interview be the first time you review the applicant’s resume. Review the resume beforehand as well as what you’re wanting from the new employee. Preparation will help keep the interview on track and determine whether a candidate is qualified or not.

Mistake #3: Asking questions off the cuff
Prepare a list of questions so that you don’t get off track with the interview. Follow-up questions to an applicant’s answer are acceptable, but managers can sometimes get into trouble by just winging it.

Mistake #4: Now knowing your legal limits
Make sure anyone that is interviewing candidates knows the legal limits of what they can and cannot ask.
Avoid questions such as:
– Are you married?
– Are you divorced?
– How old are you?
– Do you have any children or intend to have children?
– What are your daycare plans?
– Do you have any debts?
– Do you suffer from any illnesses or disabilities?
These questions are the basis for discrimination lawsuits. So remember to keep your questions related to the job at hand and how well the candidate can perform the job.

Mistake #5: Being blinded by personal preferences
Avoid letting common interests control your decision making when hiring a new employee. Just because you both like the same sports team doesn’t mean that interest is relevant to them performing the job.

Sources: Business Management Daily | The 5 most common mistakes managers make when conducting interviews

For more information contact info@crawfordadvisors.com. The information contained in this post, and any attachments, is not intended and should not be misconstrued as legal advice. You should contact your employment, benefits or ERISA attorney for legal direction.

Updating Your Employee Records System

Posted February 22, 2017 by Megan DiMartino

Do you feel weighted under a never-ending cascade of employee papers and files? It’s not your fault. You’re just keeping what the federal and state laws require you to keep.

New Year, New System

Make a fresh start of your record keeping system this year. Whether you’re going to stick with paper files, create a computer-based filing system or store records on the cloud, you need to create at least four separate sets of records for each employee.

Personnel file – This file outlines basic information such as name, address, phone number, emergency contacts, SSN and anything else that’s specific to the employee.

Payroll file – This file contains salary information, benefits, pay rate changes and any other documentation affecting the employee’s paycheck.

Medical file – The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA), requires employee medical information to be kept confidential. This file contains health insurance, life insurance, medical leave and other documents containing private medical information. Store these files so that managers or HR who need access to other files don’t have access to the medical files.

I-9 Form file – An I-9 work authorization form must be kept on file for every employee. The I-9 file must be kept separate from all other confidential employee files.

Keeping these files ensures you’re in compliance, protected in case of an audit or litigation, and keeps employee information from getting in the wrong hands.

Also, if you’re converting to electronic files, it is best practice to keep them in a format viable for future use such as a picture document (.jpg or .tif) or as a PDF file.

Sources: Business Management Daily | Update your employee records system: 4 essential components

For more information contact info@crawfordadvisors.com. The information contained in this post, and any attachments, is not intended and should not be misconstrued as legal advice. You should contact your employment, benefits or ERISA attorney for legal direction.

HRCI & SHRM Pre-approved Crawford Advisors Webinar | Voluntary Benefits: Tackling 2017’s Top Tax & Compliance Issues

Posted February 17, 2017 by Megan DiMartino

Partly because of the ACA, the discussions surrounding voluntary benefits and the implementation of them have become much more closely tied to the underlying group medical plans. By some estimations, as many as 80% of voluntary benefits programs may be out of compliance in some way.

Join Crawford Advisors’ Director of Voluntary Benefits, Stephen Ivey, for this HRCI* and SHRM** pre-approved, complimentary, one-hour webinar as he explores current tax and compliance questions and issues surrounding today’s voluntary benefits.

Topics include:

  • ERISA
  • Pre-Tax vs. Post-Tax
  • Supplemental Health Plans Taxation Questions
  • Life & Disability Taxation Questions
  • HSA Compatibility

Webinar Details:

  • Thursday, February 23, 2017
  • 1:00 – 2:00pm EST
  • No Cost to Attend
  • This webinar is open to all HR and Finance Professionals – but not to brokers, agents, TPAs and PEOs.

 

*The use of this seal confirms that this activity has met HR Certification Institute’s (HRCI) criteria for recertification credit pre-approval. This activity has been approved for 1 HR (General) recertification credit hours toward aPHR, PHR, PHRca, SPHR, GPHR, PHRi, and SPHRi recertification through HRCI.

**Crawford Advisors is recognized by SHRM to offer Professional Development Credits (PDCs) for SHRM-CP or SHRM-SCP. This program is valid for 1 PDC for the SHRM-CP or SHRM-SCP. For more information about certification or recertification, please visit shrmcertification.org.

For more information contact info@crawfordadvisors.com. The information contained in this post, and any attachments, is not intended and should not be misconstrued as legal advice. You should contact your employment, benefits or ERISA attorney for legal direction.

Finalized Paid Family Leave Law – Washington, D.C.

Posted February 15, 2017 by Megan DiMartino

The D.C. Universal Paid Leave Amendment Act of 2016 (UPLAA) was passed in December 2016 by the District of Columbia City Council and goes into effect as of July 1, 2020. This will guarantee certain periods of paid family and medical leave to private-sector employees. Beginning exactly a year before the effective date, payments will be funded by an additional .62% employer payroll tax that the city will collect from private-sector employees.

As of now the law applies only to D.C., but will have wide-ranging implications. The D.C. experience will serve as a model to a nationwide effort to seek passage of state and local paid-leave laws.

The D.C. Chamber of Commerce was opposed to the UPLAA and Mayor Muriel Bowser argued that many of the Maryland and Virginia residents who work in the city would reap the benefits of the $250 million tax increase on D.C. employers. However, Bowser did not veto the bill.

Shorter Paid-Leave Periods
The D.C. Family and Medical Leave Act (DCFMLA) is much more generous than the federal FMLA, allowing eligible employees of D.C. to take 16 weeks of unpaid leave for qualifying family and medical reasons compared to the typical 12 weeks.

However, UPLAA’s paid leave will provide shorter periods:

  • Eight weeks within a 52-week period to new parents
  • Six weeks for the care of a family member with a serious health condition
  • Two weeks for an employee’s own medical leave

In total, no more than eight weeks of paid leave is allowed within the 52-week period under the UPLAA.

Expanded Rights
The new UPLAA leave entitlement will apply to more private-sector employees than the DCFMLA:

  1. New employees will be entitled to take paid family or medical leave in circumstances in which they currently have no entitlement to take even unpaid leave.
    To currently qualify for unpaid leave, an employee must have worked for the employer at least one year before the leave request. But for the UPLAA, no such conditions apply. The UPLAA considers an individual eligible as long as they are a covered employee “during some or all of the 52 calendar weeks immediately preceding the qualifying event.”
  2. The UPLAA provides paid-leave rights to part-time employees, as long as they worked for the employer at some point in the prior year.
    The current local law only provides a right to unpaid leave to employees who have worked at least 1,000 hours during the 12-months prior to the request for family or medical leave, as opposed to the FMLA’s 1,250 hours in a 12-month period.
  3. The UPLAA applies to all private-sector employers regardless of size, except for those that are exempt from taxes in D.C. by federal law or treaty.
    This now allows employees of small businesses with fewer than 20 employees the right to take leave for qualifying family and medical reasons. Although, a clause in the law suggests that employees who work for small businesses with fewer than 20 employees are not entitled to “job protection” when returning from paid leave.
  4. The UPLAA broadens – although slightly – the class of family members for whom leave can be taken.
    The DCFMLA requires covered employers to allow unpaid leave to employees to care for family members with a serious health condition to also include:
    – A person to whom the employee is related by blood, legal custody or marriage
    – A child who lives with an employee who exercises parental responsibility
    – An individual with whom the employee lives and is in a “committed relationship”
    The UPLAA adds the following:
    – A legal ward
    – A son or daughter of a domestic partner
    – A person “who stood in loco parentis” to the employee when her or she was a
    child
    The UPLAA also includes provisions prohibiting retaliation against employees who exercise their right to paid leave. One provision goes as far as forbidding employers from retaliating by reporting, or threatening to report, an employee’s “actual suspected citizenship or immigration status” to federal, state or local agencies.

Sources: SHRM | Washington, D.C., Finalizes Paid-Family-Leave Law

For more information contact info@crawfordadvisors.com. The information contained in this post, and any attachments, is not intended and should not be misconstrued as legal advice. You should contact your employment, benefits or ERISA attorney for legal direction.

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